Your own private dropbox with free software | The Guardian Project

For our shared files, we use SparkleShare. It provides an experience very similar to Dropbox: you have a SparkleShare folder that is synced up with the service, and in turn any other users who are also linked up to it. Once its setup, it is as easy to use as Dropbox, but setting it up takes a bit more work than Dropbox. It builds upon two software packages well known for security and reliability: git and ssh, and works with Tor Hidden Services. It runs on Windows, Mac OS X, and GNU/Linux, and there is an Android client in the works.

via Your own private dropbox with free software | The Guardian Project.

Phones as swords, lovers, robots and spies

Highlighting the diversity of perception and perspective when it comes to mobile media, Freitas first spoke of the phone as a sword, with users now gaining great potential to change, damage and restrict existing structures every time they take hold of these ostensibly innocuous devices. Then there is the idea of the mobile as something akin to a robot servant, a digital personal assistant so efficacious that we soon develop a dependency. The comforting aspects of the smartphone also lend a sense of companionship to the relationship that exists between user and machine and, as such, its qualities are more readily personified than those associated with static tools. At the same time, many of us feel as though we’re carrying a little enemy around in our pockets, which kills our time and perpetually interrupts our offline activities.

Nathan Freitas @ UnlikeUs